[Closed] Print settings for Hatchbox ABS  

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barry.m2
(@barry-m2)
Eminent Member

Hi all,

I just got my first spool of Hatchbox ABS (first time straying from PLA). When I sliced, I just used the settings for Prusa ABS for temp, speed, plate, etc. The temps are 255 and 100.

Then I go and read the docs on the ABS. Their temps are 220-240 and 85 for the plate.

The print seems to be going just fine, with good adhesion (haven't tried removing it yet...) and no warping or tearing away.

I guess what I am asking is: Is there any harm with using the higher temps, or should I use theirs? Anybody else using Hatchbox ABS and, if so, what settings do you use?

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Posted : 04/07/2017 9:36 pm
carlton.h
(@carlton-h)
Eminent Member

I've got a bunch of it and am using the settings in the Prusa supplied profiles for everything. Why fix what ain't broke? 🙂

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Posted : 04/07/2017 11:52 pm
barry.m2
(@barry-m2)
Eminent Member

Thanks, Carlton. The print turned out just fine, so I agree that it ain't broke!

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Posted : 05/07/2017 6:07 am
daniel.a6
(@daniel-a6)
Reputable Member

you need to test your prints for strength, the default settings usually have the fan running and the temp too low.
you get a very nice looking ABS print however it can be brittle or delaminate easy.

ABS has to have the fan off as much as possible. it is almost impossible to have the fan off all the time, bridges or certain prints may require it.
you may need to slow down certain actions as well to get more strength from ABS. ABS once it has a weak spot fractures easy.
so you have to usually run slower then defaults and hotter then defaults.

you know you have gone the max when you are using a light colored ABS and you see burn marks in it. then you have to drop the temp down until you stop seeing them. that gives you the temperature upper limit of the filament. different ABS has higher or lower temps.

with a set max upper temperature limit of the material you are using the only adjustments you have left is speed. slowing down usually. this allows the hotter ABS to settle and harden a little so you don'e get the nozzle pulling the materials as it moves and you get what looks like a melted mess.
to speed up the printing you need to use Variable layer speeds. as the layers get smaller you need to go Slower allowing the material enough time to set. larger areas can move faster since by the time you came back over the same area for the next layer the material is already cold.

tiny parts may also require a temperature drop like a heat tower this is because something under 10mm may retain so much heat on its own that speed slow down alone cannot do it all.

all this to avoid using the FAN as much as possible, the fan introduces brittleness as it does not allow the ABS to fully melt together and any weak point with ABS will fracture with the application of force.

so default settings usually make the parts look pretty but very very brittle.

“One does not simply use a picture as signature on Prusa forums”...
Posted : 05/07/2017 5:50 pm
carlton.h
(@carlton-h)
Eminent Member

That's a great bit of feedback Daniel. I've actually made a few things that are being used in real life under slightly stressful situations and they seem to be holding up a lot better than PLA. I guess until I get to a point where it doesn't work it won't matter as much. That said, I am curious. How do you test your parts for strength?

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Posted : 05/07/2017 7:57 pm
daniel.a6
(@daniel-a6)
Reputable Member

well some of the strength was obvious as i had parts completely fall apart or delaminate just touching them wrong.

if you can pick apart the layers with your finger nail then they are not bonding and the part is very weak.

I would make parts and then break them and look at how they snapped, i kept going until the parts became harder to snap by hand and also if they broke clean and did not separate layers.

all those videos on Youtube about showing strength by putting weight on a long stick of material tells you nothing. the infill and how the infill is designed makes a huge difference in strength and they never give you that information or the difference of 5 degrees can have a massive increase in strength. ultimately it will come down to you making something and using it till failure and figuring out why it failed.

by having no fan and a temp high enough you ensure the best layer bonding and re-crystallization of material as it cools naturally(strength). the fan forces loose bonds between layers because it makes the part look as beautiful as possible and that means less strength.

you have to tailor the settings to your needs there is no real perfect setting of materials.

Take a Springo toy 3d printed. you can not have max strength because you will never be able to split the layers when the print is done.
you have to make the material settings weak so you can force delamination to get the desired effect.

you want strength you have to really melt the material together and it won't look perfect; You want looks, then realize the prettier the final product needs to be the weaker it will be. for PLA i have to overheat it causing some stringing to get the strength i need. you can hear the strength in the final part also. if you bend it and hear cracking you know it is weak and the bonds not strong enough. some materials like Nylon you can heat to the moon and it will just keep absorbing heat and get stronger. you also need to pick and choose the materials for application. PLA is good all around but it tends to suddenly crack and fail at the limit. ABS will Shear on any weak spot and is best for compression applications or where it is thick it will be stronger then PLA and tend to flex before failure. Nylon is the strongest and it will bend very far before failure but it has lots of flex it unlike pla or ABS.

“One does not simply use a picture as signature on Prusa forums”...
Posted : 09/07/2017 5:29 am
the-sh1z
(@the-sh1z)
Active Member

the issue i print benchy theres a transition band from thinner to thick where the deck meets the bow all the way around. anyone know how to fix?

Posted : 20/06/2020 2:16 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Reputable Member

I use Hatchbox black ABS quite a bit. I've always used the defaults in Prusaslicer.

I almost always use a draft shield and I'm always sure to let the print bed warm up and stabilize before starting the print.

 

Posted : 21/06/2020 2:48 am
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