High temp filament help needed  

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adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

Hi,

I have the Prusa i3 Mk 2 with the full metal hot end.

I need a filament that has a heat deflection temp around 100C.

I've been thinking about Polycarbonate but with an extrude temp of 300C, can the Mk2 handle this?

Also, anybody got any suggestions as to another filament that may have the 100C ( ish ) capability?

Another interesting one is the Taulman Blu-Print but this seems hard to come by. (i'm in the UK).

Thanks in advance.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 5:01 pm
adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

Oh, just to add, my go to filament is PETG but it gets a bit soft at 100C.

Thanks.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 5:02 pm
Omikron
(@omikron)
Estimable Member

Perhaps this is a bit too obvious of a response to be what you're looking for, but have you already tried ABS? It has a deflection temp of 98C at .46MPa.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 7:34 pm
wirlybird
(@wirlybird)
Reputable Member

Check out ASA. Don't remember the temp though off hand. I use it to replace ABS for certain things.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 8:33 pm
adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

Thanks,

I haven't tried ABS yet. I jumped from PLA to PETG as PETG seems a little more friendly than ABS regarding fumes etc.

It's definitely worth a consideration.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 9:14 pm
patrik.r
(@patrik-r)
Reputable Member

Thanks,

I haven't tried ABS yet. I jumped from PLA to PETG as PETG seems a little more friendly than ABS regarding fumes etc.

It's definitely worth a consideration.

High temp PLA would be my first choice to test if I needed that high deflection temp.

https://www.proto-pasta.com/products/high-temp-pla-v2-0

There are many brands offering this kind of PLA, and it can be threatened in the owen after print.

ASA is also a good choice, really easy to print, and with a heat deflection temp around 82 to 104 °C

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Posted : 15/11/2016 9:28 pm
MrMik
(@mrmik)
Honorable Member

I use Polymaker PC-max.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 9:33 pm
SteveDunlap13
(@stevedunlap13)
Eminent Member

I've used Nylon 680 from filaments.ca before. Printed parts that went into an autoclaver (sterilization) for a medical lab. Autoclaving reaches about 120 C - steam, etc. No deformations. Quite happy. This of course only on the MK2. Bed 80; Extruder 250; Default printing speed in S3D about 40mm/s. No cooling.

https://filaments.ca/collections/1-75mm-3d-filaments/products/nylon-680-fda-natural-1-75mm?variant=1327635152

Hope that helps.

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Posted : 15/11/2016 11:37 pm
Omikron
(@omikron)
Estimable Member

Thanks,

I haven't tried ABS yet. I jumped from PLA to PETG as PETG seems a little more friendly than ABS regarding fumes etc.

It's definitely worth a consideration.

I have found that high quality ABS generally doesn't produce noticeable fumes. I get mine from allproffesional3d.com.

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Posted : 16/11/2016 12:01 am
patrik.r
(@patrik-r)
Reputable Member

I've used Nylon 680 from filaments.ca before. Printed parts that went into an autoclaver (sterilization) for a medical lab. Autoclaving reaches about 120 C - steam, etc. No deformations. Quite happy. This of course only on the MK2. Bed 80; Extruder 250; Default printing speed in S3D about 40mm/s. No cooling.

https://filaments.ca/collections/1-75mm-3d-filaments/products/nylon-680-fda-natural-1-75mm?variant=1327635152

Hope that helps.

Are you printing directly onto the bed or are you using blue tape or something?

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Posted : 16/11/2016 7:25 am
adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

Thanks all,

Some great ideas there. One more question, are any of the above food safe?

I know that PETG clear is classed as food safe. I think that Nylon is also.

Just a thought as I suspect that ABS may not be.

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Posted : 16/11/2016 9:18 am
adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

I've used Nylon 680 from filaments.ca before. Printed parts that went into an autoclaver (sterilization) for a medical lab. Autoclaving reaches about 120 C - steam, etc. No deformations. Quite happy. This of course only on the MK2. Bed 80; Extruder 250; Default printing speed in S3D about 40mm/s. No cooling.

https://filaments.ca/collections/1-75mm-3d-filaments/products/nylon-680-fda-natural-1-75mm?variant=1327635152

Hope that helps.

Very interesting.

I've looked at Nylon before but you hear so many horror stories about getting it to print OK that I have avoided it.

Your print settings sound very straightforward so this may be an option to go for.

Thanks.

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Posted : 16/11/2016 9:24 am
SteveDunlap13
(@stevedunlap13)
Eminent Member

Depending on the part I may use glue to ensure it stays in place.

---
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Posted : 16/11/2016 9:36 pm
JohnOCFII
(@johnocfii)
Estimable Member

Similar to Patrik's recommendation, I'd suggest looking at a high-strength, high-temperature PLA such as MakerGeeks Raptor PLA. If you bake the item for 15 minutes after printing, it should withstand temperatures up to 125C. It is PLA, so it has all the easy printing characteristics of PLA.

http://www.makergeeks.com/histrength-17.html

I'm not sure how cost effective the shipping is to the UK from this U.S. based manufacturer.

John

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Posted : 19/11/2016 4:16 am
norman.f
(@norman-f)
New Member

Taulman has a filament called "BluPrint" that they claim is ok to leave in boiling water for up to five hours. I hope it is not a nylon because I ordered a spool yesterday and I just saw that nylon does not stick well to PEI.

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Posted : 19/11/2016 8:06 pm
adrian.s2
(@adrian-s2)
Eminent Member

Similar to Patrik's recommendation, I'd suggest looking at a high-strength, high-temperature PLA such as MakerGeeks Raptor PLA. If you bake the item for 15 minutes after printing, it should withstand temperatures up to 125C. It is PLA, so it has all the easy printing characteristics of PLA.

http://www.makergeeks.com/histrength-17.html

I'm not sure how cost effective the shipping is to the UK from this U.S. based manufacturer.

John

Thanks for that. I wasn't aware of Raptor PLA.

Definitely worth a look.

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Posted : 20/11/2016 3:50 pm
valent.t
(@valent-t)
Active Member

Hi,

I have the Prusa i3 Mk 2 with the full metal hot end.

I need a filament that has a heat deflection temp around 100C.

I've been thinking about Polycarbonate but with an extrude temp of 300C, can the Mk2 handle this?

Also, anybody got any suggestions as to another filament that may have the 100C ( ish ) capability?

Another interesting one is the Taulman Blu-Print but this seems hard to come by. (i'm in the UK).

Thanks in advance.

So you bought original E3D V6 that is all metal? I don't see that as an option for 1.75mm filament. Please explain which model did you buy exactly and where, I also need high temperature printing and would like to also replace current E3D with full metal one.

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Posted : 28/11/2016 9:03 pm
JohnOCFII
(@johnocfii)
Estimable Member

[quote="valent.t"
So you bought original E3D V6 that is all metal? I don't see that as an option for 1.75mm filament. Please explain which model did you buy exactly and where, I also need high temperature printing and would like to also replace current E3D with full metal one.[/quote]

I believe that E3D considers the E3D V6 to be an all metal hot-end, even though there is PTFE tube in it. Their article states it can print up to 400C (with a different thermistor).

http://e3d-online.com/E3D-v6/Full-Kit/v6-1.75mm-Universal

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Posted : 28/11/2016 10:24 pm
JohnOCFII
(@johnocfii)
Estimable Member

So you bought original E3D V6 that is all metal? I don't see that as an option for 1.75mm filament. Please explain which model did you buy exactly and where, I also need high temperature printing and would like to also replace current E3D with full metal one.

I believe that E3D considers the E3D V6 to be an all metal hot-end, even though there is PTFE tube in it. Their article states it can print up to 400C (with a different thermistor).

http://e3d-online.com/E3D-v6/Full-Kit/v6-1.75mm-Universal

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Posted : 28/11/2016 10:27 pm
PJR
 pjr
(@pjr)
Antient Member Moderator

Yes, on the V6 the "hot end" is all metal; the PTFE stops in the cool end of the extruder, with a stainless steel heat break in between the tube and nozzle. The Lite6 does not have the stainless heat break and the PTFE tube goes further down towards the nozzle.

Peter

Please note: I do not have any affiliation with Prusa Research. Any advices given are offered in good faith. It is your responsibility to ensure that by following my advice you do not suffer or cause injury, damage…...
Posted : 29/11/2016 8:25 am
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