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gooba42
(@gooba42)
New Member
Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

Seeing the concerns about the "step" in the stock heatbreak and with no real intention of picking up the MMU any time soon, I picked up a titanium heatbreak ahead of even having my printer kit. Now I'm looking and I don't see any specific instructions for replacing a heatbreak in the Prusa hotend/extruder set up.

Is it just totally generic and any E3D v6 instructions will do or will I need to fidget with it i.e. mess with getting the PTFE stub just the right length? Does anybody have the measurements handy for an all-metal replacement?

Thank you

Posted : 29/04/2020 2:37 pm
Archimedes Studio LLC
(@archimedes-studio-llc)
New Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

I'm looking to do the same.  I'm tired and overly frustrated with all the filament jams in my MK3S.  I performed the official Prusa recommended fixes, but it still consistently jams.  So which titanium heatbreak did you get and where did you get it?  Also, did you have any luck on finding replacement instructions?

Any help is greatly appreciated, thanks!

Posted : 18/08/2020 7:08 pm
gooba42
(@gooba42)
New Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

I bought this one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B081PYM2TV?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

 

But honestly I haven't even installed it yet, I never found any useable instructions and other stuff kind of took over my life in the meantime.

Posted : 18/08/2020 7:25 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

You can use the E3D V6 hotend assembly instructions for details. The only Prusa-specific trick is getting the assembled hotend into and out of the extruder. If you've got a kit, the instructions should cover this. It's a combination of pulling the assembly forward, THEN down to get it out.

I used an E3D Titanium heatbreak, ordered from Filastruder in the US. The actual replacement is trivial assuming you can get everything apart cleanly. This will be much easier on a new unit. Mine had been in use 18 months, and there was a LOT of crud built up, so I would up replacing the heatbreak, heater block (installed an E3D nickel-plated copper block), thermistor, heater cartridge and nozzle (used various but like coated copper nozzles best). A few notes:

  • Use some thermal paste at the TOP of the heatbreak where it screws into the heat sink.
  • Do NOT use thermal paste at the BOTTOM of the heatbreak where it screws into the block.
  • (Optional) Use coppaslip or other high-temp anti-seizing compound on the heatbreak bottom threads and nozzle to facilitate future removal.
  • (Optional) Use some Slice Engineering Boron Nitride high-temp thermal compound on the thermistor and heater cartridges to facilitate future replacement.
  • Consider using a collet clip to retain the PTFE tube at the top of the hotend assembly. 
  • Add a silicone sock to keep your block nice and clean for next time.
  • Keep common spares handy for the inevitable Blob of Doom.

 

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 18/08/2020 8:58 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

Wups - Damned short edit window...

  • Pay particular attention to the nozzle tightening procedure. When the heatbreak is properly inserted, there should be a small < 1mm gap between the nozzle and heater block after tightening at 285C. So long as everything is properly tightened, the exact gap is not as important as the seal between the heatbreak and nozzle.
My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 18/08/2020 9:05 pm
Archimedes Studio LLC
(@archimedes-studio-llc)
New Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

Thanks for the quick replies!  I just ordered a new genuine E3D V6 heatbreak (went with stainless steel),  Artic MX-4 thermal compound paste, and a 3-pack of genuine E3D V6 Socks Pro.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077Y2MHW8/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07L9BDY3T/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07779TP4S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Also, in my quest to get this issue resolved - I found the following link with detailed pictures to be helpful in E3D V6 assembly.  Thanks to MatterHackers for posting on their website!

https://www.matterhackers.com/articles/how-to-assemble-an-e3d-v6-all-metal-hotend?rcode=PPCADS&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1-my0-Sl6wIVoR6tBh3F5Q6KEAAYASAAEgLOzvD_BwE

I'll definitely use it as a reference, when my parts get in.

 

Thanks again for the quick replies/assistance!

Russ J

 

 

Posted : 18/08/2020 10:31 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

Not to be a downer, but stainless steel is mostly used for food-safe printing (no lead). It is used for nozzles and thus probably conducts a fair amount of heat. You want a material that ideally has poor thermal transfer properties. Titanium is very good. The newer bi-metal designs are supposed to be better. See if you can cancel the stainless order and opt for another. I'd stick with Genuine E3D.

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 19/08/2020 2:23 am
Archimedes Studio LLC
(@archimedes-studio-llc)
New Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

Oops, I misspoke.  I did order a Genuine E3D V6 Heatbreak, I just assumed it was made of stainless steel.  I'm not sure what the alloy composition is, E3D just describes it as all-metal.  I was about to pull the trigger on the titanium E3D, as it seemed to be the superior choice.  However, I came across a few postings that had some counter-points to titanium.  Here's one of them:

https://forum.prusaprinters.org/forum/original-prusa-i3-mk3s-mk3-hardware-firmware-and-software-help/don-t-buy-the-e3d-titanium-heat-break/

That's when I started to pull my hair out!  The MK3S is my 4th Prusa and in all its advances has been the most problematic thus far.  That's why I decided to go with the original E3D V6 heatbreak.  I believe this is the same one that is in my MK2S and it works like a champ.  I've invested way too much time trying to get the MK3S to print right and did not want to go into a deeper dive into researching/evaluating further pros/cons.

I'm glad the titanium is working great for you.  I'll definitely reconsider it once I have a need to print higher temperatures.

Thanks again for your valued feedback and comments.

  

Posted : 19/08/2020 3:19 pm
Archimedes Studio LLC
(@archimedes-studio-llc)
New Member
RE: Heatbreak Replacement Instructions

UPDATE  New E3D V6 heatbreak installation complete!  The initial test print results are successful.  Here's a brief summary of my process.

Installing the new heatbreak was fairly painless and not as difficult as I thought it would be.  Altogether it took me about 3 hours, but I was slow and meticulous and researching at the same time.  If I upgrade to the titanium heatbreak, I'm confident that I can complete the procedure easily in less than an hour.  

Here are some instructions from prusa3d.support that found after I completely removed the extruder motor.  It turns out that all you have to do is loosen the extruder motor and not remove all the way.  But it was no big deal removing it altogether and probably freed up some workable room space.  

https://help.prusa3d.com/en/guide/how-to-replace-a-heatbreak-heatsink-heaterblock-mk3s-mk2-5s-mmu2s_16104

Once I removed the fans and extruder motor, I just left the whole E3D V6 hotend assembly dangling there and didn't cut any zip ties.  I used an adjustable wrench to hold the heatblock and unscrewed the heatsink by hand.  Unscrewing the heatsink was easy and took less force than I thought it would.   

So left dangling was the heatblock with the nozzle and heatbreak still attached.  The heatbreak was stuck tight in the heatblock and could not be unscrewed with reasonable force with pliers.  *TIP* Make sure to heat up the heatblock before removing the heatbreak.  Once the heatblock was heated up the heatbreak was easily unscrewed with pliers.  Everything is hot hot hot, so I used adjustable wrench to hold on to heatblock and pliers to unscrew heatbreak.  I heated to 285c, but then received a temp error message shortly after.  I later hit the reset button and heated to 240c and that cleared the temp error.

I then hand-tightened (once everything cooled) the heatbreak into the heatblock until it came in good firm contact with the nozzle.  I applied the thermal paste to the appropriate heatbreak thread segment.  I then screwed on the heatsink until it was hand-tight.

I re-used the existing PTFE tube, as it appeared to be in great shape.  I inserted the tube all the way through the heatsink/break until it came to good firm contact with the interior nozzle seat.  One thing I noticed on my MK3S - it did not have a collett 'clip'.  However, the existing collett seems to be holding the PTFE tube securely in the heatsink.  I'll make a mental note of this, if this fix is unsuccessful, or if I encounter further problems down the road.

Everything went back together nicely, no re-assembly issues.  Also added the E3D pro sock while I had good open access to the heatblock, nice fit, clean look.

My first test print was successful (sort of).  I say 'sort of' only because the print failed about three quarters of the way or at about the 1-1/2 hour mark.  I used Benchy for the test print, which is about a 2 hour print.  The good news is that the failure was NOT due to a filament jam (woohoo!!!).  Typically, before replacing the heatbreak - I would get a filament jam consistently within the first 15 to 30 minutes. 

I was actually happy to see the spaghetti mess of filament that laid beside my failed Benchy.  This meant NO filament jam.  The failure was actually due to poor bed adhesion from a very slight change in the z-axis due to all the fiddling.  I did not have to re-calibrate the z, I just did a first layer calibration and that did the trick.  *TIP* recheck your z or run first layer calibration.

Second Benchy test print - perfect!  Hopefully this fix will be the end of my filament jams (fingers crossed).   

Now... I just need to figure out how to prevent filament from catching and getting hung up on exit of the underside hole lip just below the filament sensor cap when changing/unloading filament.  This mostly occurs on filament run-out and is most likely caused by tighter curl of filament at the end of the spool.  The tighter curl forces the filament to the side of the exit hole and not center hole - causing it to get stuck on removal.  No problems on filament with straight or minimal curl.  Ahh, my new quest.

Posted : 23/08/2020 9:45 pm
bobstro liked
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