Out of the box print quality  

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bugajski81
(@bugajski81)
Active Member

After reading dozens of reviews and watching dozens videos I decided that Mk3s is a printer for me. However with all that praise I'm kinda worried that I'm setting myself for disappointment and was wondering if you could help. I know that finely tuned printer can achieve amazing results, I also know how much work can get into it (having a DIY i3 kit). So question is, how does a typical mk3s fare  with basic, minimal, initial calibration, what were your first prints like?

Posted : 19/07/2020 8:56 am
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member

Spend some time in the various 3D printing Reddit groups and compare 1st print pictures. On other printers, there are typically stringing and cooling issues and fundamental print quality concerns that can be addressed with upgrades and/or experience. Most Prusa prints look very good, with minor 1st layer adjustments being the most common suggestion. Suggest you judge for yourself. 

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 19/07/2020 4:30 pm
bugajski81
(@bugajski81)
Active Member

@bobstro

I'm feeling kinda stupid I didnt think about searching reddit for that 😀

thanks

Posted : 19/07/2020 4:33 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member

I went the other way, shopping for a 2nd printer after having my Mk3 for a couple of years. Looking at those groups helped me narrow down my selection and set expectations for what I'd have to do. The 2nd printer was an expedient for printing PPE, so I wasn't expecting the same experience. In hindsight, I'm glad I had the Mk3 to depend on as I got the 2nd printer figured out.

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 19/07/2020 6:06 pm
peter.m26
(@peter-m26)
Honorable Member

There is no printer you can buy, and then without learning and putting time in it, and the prints will come out without doing work to the printer.

You will have to put time in it, and adjust every print a little different way, after a few years of printing you will learn.

A prusa printer is better then cheap printers, you will have less adjust or repair time, and the prusa will also break down after time, then you will have to repair yourself.

You can learn on this forum, you see a lot of users with problems on how to adjust.

Learn first, how to clean the steel sheet, and first layer calibration, these 2 are very important to get to 3d printing.

Posted : 19/07/2020 6:07 pm
Karl Herbert
(@karl-herbert)
Famed Member

@bugajski81,

i don't think stupid. Everyone here in the forum started 3D printing at some point and has learned something over the years. And if you can't solve something, ask here in the forum. you will usually be given friendly assistance here.

Statt zu klagen, dass wir nicht alles haben, was wir wollen, sollten wir lieber dankbar sein, dass wir nicht alles bekommen, was wir verdienen....
Posted : 19/07/2020 6:11 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Prominent Member
Posted by: @karl-herbert

@bugajski81,

i don't think stupid. Everyone here in the forum started 3D printing at some point and has learned something over the years. And if you can't solve something, ask here in the forum. you will usually be given friendly assistance here.

There is a steep learning curve that most of us have climbed and continue to climb.  The folks here are, with rare exception, very helpful on about anything, from the common issues (like the first layer not sticking) to incredibly complex ones like the nuances of temperature, speed, support parameters, etc.

I selected the MK3S as my first printer of my own mainly because the one I was considering originally, the Taz-5, had a very serious support issue due to the company being sold last year.  The one at the local 'makerspace' was very good when it worked, but unfortunately it was well student-ized and down for parts issues more than it should have been.

I was very impressed with the ease of use and the out-of-the-box print quality.  After the initial pre-flight check and Z calibration, my first prints (Prusa logo and frog) were flawless.  (My wife still keeps the frog on her desk.) 😉  I reprinted a few items that I had samples from the lab printers, and in general, the results from the MK3S were superior to those from the Taz and right up there with the prints from the higher-end Uprint and the Stratasys.

Printing with the MK3S and PrusaSlicer combination involved far less futzing around than with the Taz and Cura.

I would suggest that you get the kit form, mainly so that you will become intimately familiar with how the thing is put together and how it works.  I would also suggest that you pay close attention to detail when assembling it, and if anything does not make sense, STOP and find out why.  Also read the on-line comments on each assembly step.

Posted : 19/07/2020 6:47 pm
anders-3
(@anders-3)
Eminent Member

I just purchased my second pre-assembled MK3s, and the experience has been flawless out of the box both times. (While I would like to assemble it myself actually, I got enough of tweaking printers with the CR-10. I actually like printing more that assembling.)

Taking it out of the box, setting it up with the included PLA filament and printing one of the presliced models from the included SD card was Plug and play on both my printers. No fiddling, no gluestick and no computer needed. (The smooth build plate is very easy to get going with both PLA and PETG, the textured can be a little less sticky, but it pays off as the bottom of the models show no fill lines, just a really nice texture.)

Then later slicing the first models in PrusaSlicer 2.2 for Prusament PETG, was also simply plug and play. I really like the simplicity of the ecosystem. In my experience it just works, and the included printer, filament and settings presets are really great.

If you are new to FDM printing there is actually a very good manual included in the box with step by step guide, should get you started in a very nice way.

Prior to MK3s/Prusaslicer I was using Ultimaker/Creality/Cura and I am not missing it one bit actually.  (Especially with PrusaSlicer 2.3, which has monotonous fill pattern and ironing for great looking top finish.) 

This post was modified 3 months ago by anders-3
Posted : 19/07/2020 8:39 pm
dmr436
(@dmr436)
Active Member

What really helped for me was taking a couple of hands on classes on 3D printing over at DoSpace. Without that I would have been lost!

Main reason I got my own printer was that DoSpace closed for an extended period due to the pandemic. 

In person demos and coaching were very valuable and everyone learned from each other's mistakes. 

Posted : 19/07/2020 8:44 pm
encity5
(@encity5)
Active Member

I think i was in a similar situation. finally deciding on the prusa for the expectation of minimal initial tinkering to get up and running, and having it run reliably without fighting with it too much from the get-go. I had high hopes as it seemed like everyone was basically able to get started without much issue and obviously, this has been praised for its features and reliability.

My first print after building the kit looked great and was a big sigh of relief for me for building it correctly.

Anyways, my personal experience went downhill with my second print with (what took some time to diagnose, being new and all) a clogged heatbreak. I eventually was able to get it back up and running after i stopped being frustrated and not even printing a successfully benchy.

But since its been working (after some other issues that came up). all my prints have been coming out reliably well, and i  haven't bothered to fine tune anything yet as ive been exhausted from trying to get it working.

So i think i defintely set myself up for disappointment as i was expecting a more seamless experience from what i kept hearing about the printer. Granted im not sure i would say my experience is the most common one. My issue wasnt even related to user-error as the hotend comes assembled. (clogged heatbreak seems to be a common issue, more of an issue in warmer weather)

With that said, the actual printing has been everything i did hope for in regards to reliability, and quality and ease of use. Especially after being turned off from 3d printing from building an anet a8 kit a couple years back. I was just expecting issues to pop up after many hours of printing, not within the 3rd hour.

Posted : 20/07/2020 9:17 pm
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Prominent Member

I've heard the horror stories about clogs that just don't seem to clear, and, knocking on wood, I have yet to have one.

Yes, there's a lot of getting used to the machine.  Learning the menu layout, fitting the sheets to the print bed, dealing with those prints that just don't want to stick, etc.  (The MMU2S has even a steeper learning curve!)

I think that some prior experience in 3d printing really helps, because you then have an idea of what to expect, what prints should look like, how much time they should take, etc.

One thing I REALLY appreciate is the auto bed leveling.  I've seen a manual leveling being done and it can be a nightmare.

Posted : 21/07/2020 12:58 am
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