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Looking for a filament that is similar to a stiff rubber  

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Technical Ted
(@technical-ted)
Trusted Member
Looking for a filament that is similar to a stiff rubber

Looking for recommendations for a filament that is available in the US (like Amazon) that is similar to a stiffer type of rubber. Like what an O ring is made from. Not super flexible, but a little firmer. PETG is too stiff. So, something that might work well for the feet of a cane or walker for an elderly person. Tuff, flexible, but fairly stiff.

Also, will this filament be fairly easily printed on a Mk3S+? Any suggestions on how to best print it?

Thanks! Ted

Posted : 17/10/2021 7:32 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member
TPU

Have you looked at Cheetah TPU?  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 17/10/2021 9:07 pm
fuchsr
(@fuchsr)
Noble Member

Or Overture TPU. All TPU will need some extra attention as it is very hygroscopic, and it's probably best to print out of a dry box. 

Another elastic material I have tried is Monoprice TPE. Prints at lower temperatures than TPU, doesn't seem as hygroscopic and prints fine without a dry box. It is quite a bit softer than TPU though. I have used it as feet for outdoor furniture, but it may not be robust enough for a cane/walker.

Posted : 18/10/2021 12:59 am
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member
RE: Cheetah

Cheetah and Armadillo is a little firmer than the standard TPU.  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 19/10/2021 4:14 pm
Swiss_Cheese
(@swiss_cheese)
Noble Member

NinjaFlex is very close to stiff rubber at durometer 85A, (produced in PA. USA) then move on slowly, and with caution. There are a couple derometer 60A products out there that are the best for close to rubber products, however these take skill! and experience! (the exclamation points are not typo's) to print successfully, and if you are not there yet, save your money and start with a 95A, simply wanting to print these soft materials is not enough, there is much to learn. based on your comments about about stiffness I'm making the call that you are very new to flexibles, if not totally inexperienced. 

BTW if you don't know what durometer is, then that's a clue you aren't ready for softer products. "Google" can't make you ready for this.

Start with 95A's whether it meets your current need or not. I live in the US and will recommend  Overture Brand for your learning experience.

 

Good Luck

 

Swiss_Cheese

 

The Filament Whisperer...
Posted : 21/10/2021 4:08 am
Technical Ted
(@technical-ted)
Trusted Member
Topic starter answered:
Thanks for the help

 

Posted by: @swiss_cheese

NinjaFlex is very close to stiff rubber at durometer 85A, (produced in PA. USA) then move on slowly, and with caution. There are a couple derometer 60A products out there that are the best for close to rubber products, however these take skill! and experience! (the exclamation points are not typo's) to print successfully, and if you are not there yet, save your money and start with a 95A, simply wanting to print these soft materials is not enough, there is much to learn. based on your comments about about stiffness I'm making the call that you are very new to flexibles, if not totally inexperienced. 

BTW if you don't know what durometer is, then that's a clue you aren't ready for softer products. "Google" can't make you ready for this.

Start with 95A's whether it meets your current need or not. I live in the US and will recommend  Overture Brand for your learning experience.

 

Good Luck

 

Swiss_Cheese

 

Thanks for the input. I have not printed flex yet, although I do know what a durometer is from working with various O ring types and hardness. Looks like you are recommending I start with something like this link:

https://www.amazon.com/Overture-Filament-Flexible-Consumables-Dimensional/dp/B07VDP2S3P/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=overture%2B3d%2Bfilament%2B95A&qid=1634815680&sr=8-2-spons&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyVDYwM0lCTk0ySzNOJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwODQ4ODM1MzBCRDZSSEhFQzZJVSZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNjIzODgwUFNYSUJSSFpIOEhHJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ&th=1

Can you please give me some starting advice? Do I need an enclosure? I have both a smooth and textured sheet, which do you recommend? I'll use their suggested temperatures as a start (unless you recommend something else). Any tweaks to the profile (I use PrusaSlicer with my Mk3S+)

Thanks for the help!

Ted

Posted : 21/10/2021 11:38 am
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member
Ninja

The Overture TPU is good stuff and no enclosure is needed.  I would frankly not recommend printing TPU in a closed enclosure unless you have temperature control.  Printing it in too hot of an environment can lead to clogs.  

Ninjatek makes Ninjaflex (85A), Cheetah (92A), Armadillo (75D), Eel (90A), and Chinchilla (90A) are all good products.  They produce a wide variety of flexible products to meet your needs.  

Posted by: @technical-ted

 

Posted by: @swiss_cheese

NinjaFlex is very close to stiff rubber at durometer 85A, (produced in PA. USA) then move on slowly, and with caution. There are a couple derometer 60A products out there that are the best for close to rubber products, however these take skill! and experience! (the exclamation points are not typo's) to print successfully, and if you are not there yet, save your money and start with a 95A, simply wanting to print these soft materials is not enough, there is much to learn. based on your comments about about stiffness I'm making the call that you are very new to flexibles, if not totally inexperienced. 

BTW if you don't know what durometer is, then that's a clue you aren't ready for softer products. "Google" can't make you ready for this.

Start with 95A's whether it meets your current need or not. I live in the US and will recommend  Overture Brand for your learning experience.

 

Good Luck

 

Swiss_Cheese

 

Thanks for the input. I have not printed flex yet, although I do know what a durometer is from working with various O ring types and hardness. Looks like you are recommending I start with something like this link:

https://www.amazon.com/Overture-Filament-Flexible-Consumables-Dimensional/dp/B07VDP2S3P/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=overture%2B3d%2Bfilament%2B95A&qid=1634815680&sr=8-2-spons&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEyVDYwM0lCTk0ySzNOJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwODQ4ODM1MzBCRDZSSEhFQzZJVSZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUEwNjIzODgwUFNYSUJSSFpIOEhHJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ&th=1

Can you please give me some starting advice? Do I need an enclosure? I have both a smooth and textured sheet, which do you recommend? I'll use their suggested temperatures as a start (unless you recommend something else). Any tweaks to the profile (I use PrusaSlicer with my Mk3S+)

Thanks for the help!

Ted

 

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 21/10/2021 12:43 pm
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