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jasonstone.designs
(@jasonstone-designs)
Active Member
Posted by: @mete

@bobstro

I am looking for a good way to do this "Consider adding a smart outlet that will shut off power to the 3D printer if the smoke detector is activated.". Any recommendations ? I guess it is not a necessity (or better to have online than nothing), but it would be nice to have an offline solution (not using wifi etc.).

The problem with a system that simply cuts off power is that it's going to be too little too late. If there's smoke, then there's already potentially a fire. Cutting off the power isn't going to do much good at that point. Maybe combing the two concepts is the best option?

Posted : 07/10/2020 1:47 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member
Posted by: @jasonstone-designs

The problem with a system that simply cuts off power is that it's going to be too little too late. If there's smoke, then there's already potentially a fire. Cutting off the power isn't going to do much good at that point. Maybe combing the two concepts is the best option?

Definitely worth combining approaches! Leaving power on is not going to be helpful in any fire situation, so ideally you want to cut it. There have been other suggestions in this thread on actual extinguisher elements that could be added in. I'm interested in the BlazeCut system sold by MatterHackers

 

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 07/10/2020 4:06 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member
Posted by: @james-watriss
Posted by: @mete

@bobstro

I am looking for a good way to do this "Consider adding a smart outlet that will shut off power to the 3D printer if the smoke detector is activated.". Any recommendations ? I guess it is not a necessity (or better to have online than nothing), but it would be nice to have an offline solution (not using wifi etc.).

I'll add my name to the list of people who are looking for something like this. Has anyone set something up themselves? Have any product recommendations? Or am I destined to dig through the dusty back corners of my brain to remember how to design the relay circuit?

There are several YouTube videos on the topic. At one point I had a link to an inexpensive battery-powered smoke detector that had an output that could trigger a smart outlet directly via a wired connection, but that link seems to be dead now. There are also wireless/IoT solutions, though I'd beware making it too complicated.

I did purchase one of the packaged systems off Tindie and it seems complete. It uses a dedicated wifi network between the battery-powered detector and outlet. It should work, but is not ideal due to lack of information.

 

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 07/10/2020 4:17 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member

I have looked at the one on Tindie.  It looks promising.  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 07/10/2020 7:01 pm
Tim
 Tim
(@tim-2)
Illustrious Member

Then there's the roll your own method using something like this:

https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/trijalsrimal/fire-gas-and-smoke-detector-8241dc

That, an Arduino mini, an SSR, and a few lines of code and you are done.

It is always wise to get more than one opinion...
Posted : 07/10/2020 7:28 pm
Mete
 Mete
(@mete)
Active Member

@bobstro

Definitely. It is actually a simple problem to solve I think, so why not to cut power automatically. I keep a fire extinguisher around and keep particularly dangerous materials not too close. I just built a variation of mk3s enclosure v1 which is itself a problem I think but there are such (wood etc.) materials around anyway -I am using the printer inside the apartment-, so I think it is not going to help much even if I have a better (in fire resistance sense) enclosure.

Posted : 07/10/2020 8:13 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member

I am not confident enough to trust my home to a homemade item.  

--------------------
Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 07/10/2020 8:32 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member

I'm still reading through the details, but this combination looks promising. It's a smart battery smoke detector with 2 smart outlets. Not cheap @ $150 though.

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 07/10/2020 10:21 pm
tlveik
(@tlveik)
Active Member

This is what I am going to do. But don't take my word for it. If you like the idea, prove to yourself that it will work for you.

The "IOT Relay" doesn't really have anything to do with IOT so not sure why they call it that. The smoke detector causes power to be disconnected when it alarms. Then the relay keeps power disconnected even after the smoke detector stops alarming. After power is lost for whatever reason, the Reset button must be pressed to send power to the printer again.

I think this idea is better than the fire balls for two reasons.

1. Smoke detectors are very good at detecting very small amounts of smoke. Especially in an enclosure. I think this will happen long before a fire actually gets started and it gets hot enough in there to burst the fire ball.

2. A fire ball doesn't disconnect power so re-ignition is possible.

Again, don't take my word for it. If you like the idea, prove to yourself that it will work for you.

Circuit

Posted : 08/10/2020 4:19 am
Same Old Shane
(@same-old-shane)
Admin

As mentioned there are safety features built into the printer with thermal runaway on the hotend and the heatbed, so if the temperature starts to rise and over a certain amount, the printer will shut down. Also the plastic parts are made out of PETG which is a self extinguishing material. 

So if you maintain the printer and do regular checks on it (say after every 200 hours of printing) and check the cable connections on the control board and also on the back of the heat bed to make sure they are still connected. For example, if the connection on the back of the heat bed is loose, it can overheat, and will melt the PETG, (as this happen to me as I did not properly check that connection) but PETG did not ignite.

I can understand the concerns that are brought up and I am always on the side of playing it safe, the idea of the smoke detector that will kill the power, but I will say that I have several different printers, and I am least worried or concerned with the prusa machines as I know what went in to create them and how serious the company takes safety overall.

I hope this helps a little 🙂

 

Shane

 

Shane (AKA FromPrusa)...
Posted : 19/10/2020 1:27 pm
nick.b16
(@nick-b16)
Eminent Member

@jasonstone-designs

I have a KORA enclosure, a little ecpensive but I purchased a fire suppressor Dry Powder Automatic Trigger @ c. 79C , it also comes with a Optional Heat Sensor Alarm so you get a early warning it thing start to go wrong. I would search the internet for similar items and see if you find a cheaper version.

https://www.kora3d.com/products/accessories

Posted : 20/10/2020 6:49 pm
locktec
(@locktec)
Active Member

3m makes a Window Film which will make the glass or Plexiglas just about bomb and fire proof

that the public can buy

Posted : 20/10/2020 10:08 pm
safetywaveau
(@safetywaveau)
New Member

These are some of tips for safety recommendation 

  1. Understand the risks. Once you know the particular hazards of your job or workplace, you can take steps to reduce your risk of work-related injury or illness.
  2. Reduce workplace stress. Common causes include long hours, heavy workload, job insecurity and conflicts with coworkers or bosses. Stress can lead to depression, sleeping difficulties and problems with concentration.
  3. Take regular breaks. Staying fresh and alert will help you avoid injury or burnout. Schedule the most difficult tasks of each day for times when your concentration is best, such as first thing in the morning.
  4. Avoid stooping or twisting. Use ergonomically designed furniture and equipment, and rearrange your work area so that everything you need is within easy reach.
Posted : 01/03/2021 6:58 am
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