Do you measure your Prusa filament?  

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mkio9
 mop
(@mop)
Estimable Member

do you measure the diameter of Prusament or other filament brands you can get from Prusa and change the extrude rate based on the cube printing test? or you is it necessary?

Posted : 15/06/2020 10:28 pm
Sembazuru
(@sembazuru)
Prominent Member

I have to say that I'm lazy and don't measure my filament diameter. But, I do run an extrusion multiplier calibration for each Make/Model (but not color) of each filament. I'm hoping the extrusion multiplier calibration accounts for out of spec filament diameter...

See my (limited) designs on:
PrusaPrinters - https://www.prusaprinters.org/social/1448-sembazuru/prints
Thingiverse - https://www.thingiverse.com/Sembazuru/designs...
Posted : 15/06/2020 11:46 pm
Kaiede
(@kaiede)
Active Member
Posted by: @sembazuru

I have to say that I'm lazy and don't measure my filament diameter. But, I do run an extrusion multiplier calibration for each Make/Model (but not color) of each filament. I'm hoping the extrusion multiplier calibration accounts for out of spec filament diameter...

I do something very similar. A lot of the filament width artifacts I fight with fine detail are due to rapid changes in filament width. You'd need some sort of LUT to account for it. So measuring filament width is not buying me anything. I just try to avoid using Fillamentum, eSun or other +-0.05mm filaments if I am trying to create super-tiny details like miniatures. 

I'm curious what you define as a "make/model"? Say, would Galaxy Black/Purple be in the same group as Jet Black/Azure Blue?

 

Posted : 16/06/2020 12:10 am
nikolai.r
(@nikolai-r)
Noble Member

In general I'm not trying to achieve best looking print results where 0.02mm variance is playing a role. You can spend so much time to dial in for one filament/printer/object. But you will need to do the same thing again for even a different object with the same printer/filament. Not worth wasting my time.

That's why I check the filament only if it's causing any trouble. Most of the brands I'm using are printing pretty reliable.

Often linked posts:
Going small with MMU2
Real Multi Material
My prints on Instagram...
Posted : 16/06/2020 6:47 pm
william.m51
(@william-m51)
Estimable Member

When I am printing with a 0.25mm nozzle, I will print a calibration cube for every roll I put on as I am obviously doing fine detail.  If I'm printing with a 0.4mm nozzle and just doing normal printing, I generally calibrate when I start a new manufacturer/type of filament, or when there are print artifacts (under/over extrusion) that make me think the filament may be a bit big or small.  And I generally try and order +/-0.03mm or better filaments unless I'm in a real bind.

Posted : 16/06/2020 7:46 pm
sw3De
(@sw3de)
Trusted Member

I have often wondered how much it really matters if it’s +/-0.02mm or if it’s +/-0.05mm. 
Lately I have exclusively used filaments that claims +/-0.025mm but in all honesty I can’t say I noticed any difference (I’m not saying there isn’t). So my question is; is there a good way to illustrate the difference? I can read the numbers but how much is it really?

I do realize this may sound like a really dumb question...

Is the percentage the same for the difference in diameters as you would need to adjust your flow settings?

Posted : 17/06/2020 3:50 am
Sembazuru
(@sembazuru)
Prominent Member
Posted by: @kaiede
Posted by: @sembazuru

I have to say that I'm lazy and don't measure my filament diameter. But, I do run an extrusion multiplier calibration for each Make/Model (but not color) of each filament. I'm hoping the extrusion multiplier calibration accounts for out of spec filament diameter...

I do something very similar. A lot of the filament width artifacts I fight with fine detail are due to rapid changes in filament width. You'd need some sort of LUT to account for it. So measuring filament width is not buying me anything. I just try to avoid using Fillamentum, eSun or other +-0.05mm filaments if I am trying to create super-tiny details like miniatures. 

I'm curious what you define as a "make/model"? Say, would Galaxy Black/Purple be in the same group as Jet Black/Azure Blue?

 

By make and model I mean make = manufacturer, model = plastic type.

See my (limited) designs on:
PrusaPrinters - https://www.prusaprinters.org/social/1448-sembazuru/prints
Thingiverse - https://www.thingiverse.com/Sembazuru/designs...
Posted : 17/06/2020 3:54 am
william.m51
(@william-m51)
Estimable Member

@sw3de

Extrusion is a volume and a change in diameter is squared when computing the volume.  So will 0.02mm is a 1.14% change in width of the filament, its a 2.30% change in extruded volume.  0.05mm is a 5.80% change in volume.  So a +/- 0.02mm filament can vary in extruded volume by 4.6%.  A +/- 0.05mm filament can vary by 11.60%.  If you calibrate so you have no under extrusion, the you can end up over extruding by more than 10%.  Likewise, if you calibrate for no over extrusion, you can under  extrude by 10%.  That's a noticeable amount -- especially over extrusion on the top layer.

One other thing to consider.  The PTFE tube is 1.85mm +/-0.02mm.  If you get a PTFE tube on the small end, 1.83mm and a +/-0.05mm filament on the large end, 1.80mm, your clearance is going to be tight, to say the least.  And that's assuming that the filament is truly less that +0.05mm.  

Posted : 17/06/2020 4:03 am
sw3De liked
sw3De
(@sw3de)
Trusted Member

@william-m51

I guess you attended your math classes 😀

Thank you for a spot on answer!

Posted : 17/06/2020 4:26 am
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