beginner question: Procedure for start of prints?  

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encity5
(@encity5)
Active Member

Thinking im overthinking this a bit so bare with me. But are there any procedures you do when you start a print?

So for me, as the printer is reaching temp, and filament is oozing out, im usually trying to clear the filament. Should i not even bother with doing this? do most people just hit print, and let the nozzle prime itself and do the print?

I usually see some of that filament curl slightly before print and it doesnt always fall off after it primes the nozzle. (so it might end up touching the nozzle / heatblock, which i want to keep clean)
Also sometimes part of the filament mgiht fall / break off and land in the middle of the bed, (before the print starts), so i usually like to be there to brush it off.

Should I just be trusting the printer more? or do others usually watch over the start of the print too?

This topic was modified 3 months ago by encity5
Posted : 07/07/2020 4:24 pm
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member

The easiest way to do these sorts of things is in the startup gcode. One common customization is to implement a "2 step warmup" procedure that does the following:

  1. Start warming the nozzle to a "no ooze" temp (I like 160C).
  2. Start warming the bed.
  3. When the nozzle hits the no-ooze temp -- hot enough to soften dangling filament but not ooze -- home.
  4. Move the nozzle to a warmup position (not really necessary, but I like to do it).
  5. After warming, do mesh bed leveling. Any dangling filament will be soft, but should not create those dots around the bed. There's a chance a large string might drop off, but not usually a problem. Still worth watching the 1st layer.
  6. After leveling, print a prime line with a trap blob at the start and a wipe action at the end to eliminate any accumulations on the nozzle.

I've got a documented example here you can use for inspiration.

It's worth noting that Prusa has adopted a similar process for the new Mini printer. Nothing official has worked its way back to the Mk3/3s yet.

This post was modified 3 months ago by bobstro
My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 07/07/2020 5:20 pm
encity5 liked
jsw
 jsw
(@jsw)
Prominent Member

I often do a quick inspection before a print and brush off any obvious ooze or crud on or around the nozzle.

Posted : 08/07/2020 6:39 am
nikolai.r
(@nikolai-r)
Noble Member

Most of the prints I'm watching it start and check first layer is placed well. Sometimes I'm removing the oozing filament. If you have time, I would definitely recommend watching the printer. Especially as a beginner it will help you to understand when the print fails and why.

Often linked posts:
Going small with MMU2
Real Multi Material
My prints on Instagram...
Posted : 08/07/2020 6:09 pm
peter.m26
(@peter-m26)
Honorable Member

-Clean nozzle with copper wire brush if needed, so filament won' t stick. Petg will often stick to nozzle.

- Start print, clean nozzle with dripping filament, before prints starts.

- Check the first line off the print, after calibration, then adjust z-layer. Yes every print.

-Check after the first layer is printed, then you see of it sticks enough(white color then it is already releasing), check if the height is correct, this is important so you do not have a big ball of filament the next morning, because of model not sticking enough.

This without modifying the printer.

And of course keep bed clean with dish soap.

Posted : 09/07/2020 10:01 am
encity5
(@encity5)
Active Member

@bobstro

I've been using your startup gcode for the past few prints and its been really great! Appreciate the effort in not just putting the gcode together but that stellar documentation and breakdown of how to understand it!

Posted : 13/07/2020 2:47 pm
stephan.iesmi606
(@stephan-iesmi606)
New Member
Posted by: @bobstro

The easiest way to do these sorts of things is in the startup gcode. One common customization is to implement a "2 step warmup" procedure that does the following:

  1. Start warming the nozzle to a "no ooze" temp (I like 160C).
  2. Start warming the bed.
  3. When the nozzle hits the no-ooze temp -- hot enough to soften dangling filament but not ooze -- home.
  4. Move the nozzle to a warmup position (not really necessary, but I like to do it).
  5. After warming, do mesh bed leveling. Any dangling filament will be soft, but should not create those dots around the bed. There's a chance a large string might drop off, but not usually a problem. Still worth watching the 1st layer.
  6. After leveling, print a prime line with a trap blob at the start and a wipe action at the end to eliminate any accumulations on the nozzle.

I've got a documented example here you can use for inspiration.

It's worth noting that Prusa has adopted a similar process for the new Mini printer. Nothing official has worked its way back to the Mk3/3s yet.

Looking great work dear, I really appreciated to you on this quality work.

Nice post!!

walgreenslistens...
Posted : 04/08/2020 5:14 am
bobstro
(@bobstro)
Illustrious Member

Glad the notes are useful! Let me know if you spot any issues.

My notes and disclaimers on 3D printing and miscellaneous other tech projects
He is intelligent, but not experienced. His pattern indicates two dimensional thinking. -- Spock in Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan...
Posted : 04/08/2020 2:57 pm
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