Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?
 
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jmone
(@jmone)
Reputable Member
Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?

I'm trying to create 3D patterns (for sand casting) with a Draft for easy mould release.  I'm able to use simple SW like 3D Builder to take a 2D image and using Height Map turn it into a 3D model just fine but the edges are all vertical.  Is there a simple way of doing the same thing but apply a Draft during the 2d --> 3D extrusion?

 

Thanks

Nathan

Posted : 13/11/2021 11:16 pm
towlerg
(@towlerg)
Noble Member
RE:

Sadly there really is no task in most CAD program that could be described as simple. You need to audit a bunch of CAD progs and ask that question on their forum.

FWIW there are at least two ways to create draft in DesignSpark, you could draw the top and bottom surfaces and use the blend option. Or you could draw the 3d object without draft then create a section thro the face(s) that need draft, draw a construction line at the draft angle and use that to pull.

Having said that I'm sure theres a package out there that has that as a standard function.

edit. bottom of picture import clipped, click on picture to see whole thing

This post was modified 3 months ago 2 times by towlerg
Posted : 14/11/2021 11:46 am
Diem
 Diem
(@diem)
Noble Member

With a 2d master you will need to make second copy with the draft dimensions, elevate it, and create a hull around both parts.

You will also need to post process to smooth the layers so the sand does not stick at the removal stage.

Cheerio,

Posted : 14/11/2021 8:13 pm
jmone
(@jmone)
Reputable Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?

Thanks - this is what I feared.... and I'm not sure it will work well with a combination of Letters, Images etc that have both internal and external perimeters that need drafting as they are in opposite directions.  I'm wondering if instead a use a blur on the 2nd image to create a greyscale, then do a height map extrude

Posted : 14/11/2021 9:44 pm
jmone
(@jmone)
Reputable Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?

FYI - this looks promising just importing an image into MS 3D Builder using Height Map and Level 3 Smoothing on a simple line art JPG.  I'll now just slice out a section and see how it goes.

Posted : 14/11/2021 10:31 pm
jmone
(@jmone)
Reputable Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?

Yup it works.  Cast the 2D Cookie Stamp deign from the above post and while it took a few goes to get it to release cleanly, it did work well.  Just enough draft on all surfaces.

There is something satisfying about turning a 3D print into metal!

Posted : 15/11/2021 4:44 am
Clemens M.
(@clemens-m)
Prominent Member
@ jmone

Very nice - can you explain in a little more detail mold building and casting process. Was that done by you? What material - looks like aluminum. What kind of furnace? (so many questions). Maybe you have a webpage?

Best regards, Clemens

Posted : 28/11/2021 1:48 pm
jmone
(@jmone)
Reputable Member
Topic starter answered:
RE: Software to Extrude Down a 2D image with a Draft?

Hi Clemens, Yes that was done be me, from printing to making the mold (ramming it up), and pouring the metal (Aluminium in this case)... and no I don't have a webpage but there are tons of YouTube videos on the subject.  If you are new to casting metal, I'd suggest you start with a simple and cheap setup and see you go as it can get expensive and complicated quickly:

- Furnace:  A simple, cheap electric furnace from ebay/amazon.  They are great for Aluminium in smallish pours.  They "can" work for metals up to Copper (Brass, Bronze etc) but getting a good pour temperature is right at the top end of it's capability (and the electric coil will wear out quicker).  I've also a Propane (LPG) furnace which is good for larger pours and is good for Copper.  I also have an Induction Furnace that I wanted to use to higher temp pours (say CuNickel) but you need dedicated electrical circuits and while this "low end consumer" unit shows promise, it has proved unreliable with poor manufacturing QC and a couple of HW Failures.  I've found the stated temp claims on these products to be wildly optimistic and don't even think about trying iron/steel.  Also note that the Crucibles are all a "consumable" and degrade over time.

- Molding / Ramming Up a Pattern:  The simplest way is to create your own flasks with simple timber and then use a pre-mixed "sand" such as PetroBond that you tightly ram up after sprinkling you pattern with a "release powder" (such as talc).  Petrobond can get expensive if you are doing a lot of casting or doing larger items, so you may end up making your own "green sand" but it is a great way to start. 

Depending on what you want to make, Tin could be a good start as it melts at only 232c so you don't need a furnace at all.  You can do this on a stainless steel sauce pan on the stove or with a Gas Torch.  You can even make molds in silicon rubber which is how I started. 

Posted : 28/11/2021 8:21 pm
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