PrusaPrinters GraphQL API  

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Timbroddin
(@timbroddin)
New Member

Hi,

I love the new PrusaPrinters.org, and all the changes you guys have been doing to make the website better. I was looking at the inner workings, and I saw you have a GraphQL backend to power the site.

Would it be possible to allow introspection of this API so other developers can build could solutions (like a native app, extra filtering options - popular uploaded last week) against it? I know it's possible by looking at your Chrome dev tools, but enabling introspection would make this easier and more Prusa-approved 🙂

As for new features ... I know this site is probably quite complex, but it would be nice if you open-sourced it so the community can work together with the fine team at Prusa to make it even better.

Thanks!

 

 

Posted : 09/05/2021 12:42 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member

You should contact them.  

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Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 09/05/2021 1:12 pm
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(@)
Illustrious Member

One of the reasons they did the upgrade was to eliminate support hours. Adding/enabling a layer to allow random folk to make changes or additions, well, is a bit contrary to their goal. Plus - I doubt they want to expose anything that could possibly be used to ferret out their customer and business side, like authentication: and we all know that zero day faults are discovered every few seconds. 

Posted : 09/05/2021 4:16 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member

@tim-2

Good points.  You are probably correct.  

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Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 09/05/2021 5:31 pm
Timbroddin
(@timbroddin)
New Member

@tim-2

I understand. But PrusaSlicer is open source, as is the firmware and the printer designs. I think we, as a community, can really help PrusaPrinters.org become the best model database in the world. Something that would really benefit Prusa’s business as well 😀

Posted : 09/05/2021 6:29 pm
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(@)
Illustrious Member

@timbroddin

Open source just means people can copy it because it is in the public domain. It doesn't mean people can or even should be allowed to change a product that is by all intents and purposes a commercial product. Sure they don't sell it - but I'd probably start running away if I knew any person who thought they were a coder started hacking on it - and also sure they depend on it to help them sell printers, and they want it to be reliable and secure.

Open source can help with security - other people can look at it - but reliability breaks down when you have an uncontrolled set of contributors. Yes, version control tools can help, but in time you begin to get too many code styles in play because every contributor has their own style and they refuse to follow any sensible guidelines, formatting and comments break down, people come and go, features become unsupportable, etc. 

If you feel strongly enough about making a group built slicer - take the source and go for it. Nothing stopping you. That was how Slic3r was born, more or less. Or, go and contribute to Slic3r ... isn't it still considered open source and accepting contributions? https://slic3r.org/

ps: I managed software at my last gig - a team in the US and a team in India. It was commercial, proprietary, hundreds of patents. Expensive, and the best in class. I left nearly 10 years ago, and the product is still being maintained and sold. So I do have a good perspective.

This post was modified 1 month ago by --
Posted : 09/05/2021 7:40 pm
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(@)
Illustrious Member

@timbroddin

And thinking about it -- join Prusa's alpha/beta programs. Start finding warts in their tools and then offer up code fixes. Be a part of the crowd doing work everyone will appreciate. I've heard rumors they even reward folk making that effort.

And I'm honestly not trying to be a road block to progress. Rather, just pointing out pitfalls to doing things without good planning. Try to get random contributors to follow timelines, or follow official processes that are required for product certification, or things like Scrum, lol.

Posted : 09/05/2021 7:55 pm
cwbullet
(@cwbullet)
Illustrious Member

@tim-2

That sounds link a good option for those with the skills and talent.  

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Chuck H
3D Printer Review Blog...
Posted : 09/05/2021 8:20 pm
Timbroddin
(@timbroddin)
New Member
Posted by: @tim-2

@timbroddin

Open source just means people can copy it because it is in the public domain. It doesn't mean people can or even should be allowed to change a product that is by all intents and purposes a commercial product. Sure they don't sell it - but I'd probably start running away if I knew any person who thought they were a coder started hacking on it - and also sure they depend on it to help them sell printers, and they want it to be reliable and secure.

Open source can help with security - other people can look at it - but reliability breaks down when you have an uncontrolled set of contributors. Yes, version control tools can help, but in time you begin to get too many code styles in play because every contributor has their own style and they refuse to follow any sensible guidelines, formatting and comments break down, people come and go, features become unsupportable, etc. 

If you feel strongly enough about making a group built slicer - take the source and go for it. Nothing stopping you. That was how Slic3r was born, more or less. Or, go and contribute to Slic3r ... isn't it still considered open source and accepting contributions? https://slic3r.org/

ps: I managed software at my last gig - a team in the US and a team in India. It was commercial, proprietary, hundreds of patents. Expensive, and the best in class. I left nearly 10 years ago, and the product is still being maintained and sold. So I do have a good perspective.

I have to disagree here. Open source is all about working together toward a shared goal. PrusaSlicer has 134 contributors, and no one is running away with any code. And even if they do (and adhere to the set license), they are free to do so. That's exactly what Prusa did when they created their fork of Slic3r. And doing so, and leveraging the power of the community, has been very good to Prusa's business.

But this doesn't have to be a discussion about open source and whether it's good or bad. And I'm also not talking about building a group slicer (PrusaSlicer is already a great open source project).

My question was about the PrusaPrinters.org API above all. Right now, the model database of this website has an API. But it's not open (introspection is disabled). It would be great if Prusa could open this up. Just like Thingiverse and MyMiniFactory have a public API. Doing so can enable a whole host of cool integrations. Imagine rating a print right on your Octoprint touchscreen after printing it or an AR app that shows you the model before printing it.

The support needed from Prusa is minimal (if any), and it would fit in Prusa's philosophy of openness. As would opening up the code behind this website. As a community, we can really help Prusa build the best model database in the world.

 

Posted : 11/05/2021 12:19 pm
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(@)
Illustrious Member

@timbroddin

It looks like you are relatively new to the forums, and you may not have read the intro pages. 

This is a peer to peer forum. Prusa employees do not routinely read any of the posts. Sure, from time to time they'll drop in, but you generally will never get a response from them by posting here. 

Github is where Prusa employees lurk: https://github.com/prusa3d  

Post your suggestion over there if you actually want an official  reply, or contact them directly via email or store chat.

Posted : 11/05/2021 4:18 pm
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