Fabric to PLA adhesive  

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aWride
(@awride)
New Member

So I have two peices that need be be loosely connected. My plan was to take straps (Like the kind on backpacks) and glue them to each piece. I have tried superglue and a 2n1 epoxy but nothing holds them on well. It is so frustrating. Any ideas for attaching this? (It is for shoulder armor so needs to be strong since it will be worn.) Thanks!

Posted : 26/02/2021 4:27 am
Yveske
(@yveske)
Estimable Member

Just attach it like you're attaching a camera strap to the camera

Attach a camera strap

Having problems with bed adhesion every morning......
Posted : 26/02/2021 6:40 am
Neophyl
(@neophyl)
Famed Member

Contact adhesive, like Evo-Stik.  Not sure what the equivalent is in other countries but in the UK Evo-Stik (the red version) has been used for decades and used to be called carpet adhesive amongst other things.

Posted : 26/02/2021 7:19 am
Diem
 Diem
(@diem)
Reputable Member

So I have two peices that need be be loosely connected. My plan was to take straps (Like the kind on backpacks) and glue them to each piece. I have tried superglue and a 2n1 epoxy but nothing holds them on well. It is so frustrating. Any ideas for attaching this? (It is for shoulder armor so needs to be strong since it will be worn.) Thanks!

Which filament are they printed in?

Ideally you incorporate attachment points in the original design; it's probably too late now...

Two part epoxy doesn't stick well to any of the common filaments. 

Superglue would work with most but only if the surface was prepared first - otherwise most of it wicks into the lay of the filament and you're only sticking to the surface of the outer strands.  It doesn't like wet/sweat either.

For most filaments, possibly not nylon, cheap contact adhesive is one of the better options but don't use it as usually specified, clamp the parts together with some wet adhesive between them.

Some of the higher temperature printed plastics can take cautious application of hot-melt glue.

If you have a 3D pen you can use it to weld parts together - print attachments and weld them to the armour. Caveat: welding is another skill, read up on stick welding first.

Or you can join them mechanically.  Melt holes for riveting (you'll need a washer on both sides) or even to stitch through.

I would suggest a comination of mechanical and glued joints.

 

 

This post was modified 2 months ago by Diem
Posted : 26/02/2021 8:14 am
Dres
 Dres
(@dres)
Active Member
Posted by: @awride

So I have two peices that need be be loosely connected. My plan was to take straps (Like the kind on backpacks) and glue them to each piece. I have tried superglue and a 2n1 epoxy but nothing holds them on well. It is so frustrating. Any ideas for attaching this? (It is for shoulder armor so needs to be strong since it will be worn.) Thanks!

Have you considdered screwing them together? Maybe using a two-part design: The original part above and an additional part (kind of a plate - maybe with additional teeth-like structures for better grip) below the belt.

Posted : 26/02/2021 1:27 pm
Clarmrrsn
(@clarmrrsn)
Reputable Member
Posted by: @dres
Posted by: @awride

So I have two peices that need be be loosely connected. My plan was to take straps (Like the kind on backpacks) and glue them to each piece. I have tried superglue and a 2n1 epoxy but nothing holds them on well. It is so frustrating. Any ideas for attaching this? (It is for shoulder armor so needs to be strong since it will be worn.) Thanks!

Have you considdered screwing them together? Maybe using a two-part design: The original part above and an additional part (kind of a plate - maybe with additional teeth-like structures for better grip) below the belt.

Second that.

If looking for strength a mechanical fixing is the way forward.

The camera type loop back fixing suggested above is a very good idea, both are very strong, and have the added benefit of being adjustable.  Could integrate these into your prints so don't need to attach them, just feed in the straps. 

This post was modified 2 months ago by Clarmrrsn
Tank you very much!...
Posted : 26/02/2021 2:01 pm
Mirar
(@mirar)
Trusted Member

Superglue (cyanoacrylate) works great for gluing PLA (like Galaxy Black). It might not work on the strap, which is probably nylon?

I would try use a soldering iron to melt them together, poking in a dozen small points or so.

 

An alternative is, if it's thin cloth, to add the cloth mid print and have the printer continue above the cloth.

This post was modified 2 months ago by Mirar
Posted : 27/02/2021 4:29 pm
AnnieR
(@annier)
Eminent Member

Go to any large fabric shop or even a craft shop and they will have all kinds of fabric adhesives and glues, both for simple mending and for more permanent things. 

Ask for one that does just that, bonds fabric to plastic. 

Posted : 27/02/2021 5:36 pm
karl-herbert
(@karl-herbert)
Illustrious Member

@neophyl

Thanks for the tip - I have found and will test this out ( https://www.amazon.de/EVOSTIK-Impact-Adhesive-Large-Tube/dp/B0001P03S8# )

(I hope it is the one you meant) 🙂 

Statt zu klagen, dass wir nicht alles haben, was wir wollen, sollten wir lieber dankbar sein, dass wir nicht alles bekommen, was wir verdienen....
Posted : 27/02/2021 6:10 pm
Neophyl
(@neophyl)
Famed Member

@karl-herbert

Yep that’s the type. Last time I bought some I got a tin as we were gluing a lot of armour together. Remember that like any glue the more surface area the better. 
On my last shoulder bells (a set of Mandalorian ones) I’ve used t nuts glued to the inside of the ridged areas but to increase surface area I printed off sections that go over the t nuts and sandwich them between 2 layers. This gives a lot of surface area and you can screw in straps as needed. 

Posted : 27/02/2021 7:29 pm
Dres
 Dres
(@dres)
Active Member

@neophyl

What are it's glueing propperties? It's called impact or contact adhesive. Is it really that quick? Is it strong? How flexible is it (in terms of breaking when bent)?
I have always been disappointed by super glue which is called "Sekundenkleber" in Germany, which roughly translates as "seconds glue". The only thing acutally glued in seconds are fingers.
Activators sadly often ruin the printsurface. :-/

Posted : 28/02/2021 9:45 am
Dres
 Dres
(@dres)
Active Member

Oh and one other important question: How long is it's shelf life and/or can it be put in the fridge like super glue to keep it "alive"?

Posted : 28/02/2021 9:47 am
Neophyl
(@neophyl)
Famed Member

The evo-stik type contact adhesive are very strong.  At least the red type.  They do/did ? a green package version a few years a go and that was disappointing.

It does have a shelf life as its air drying, don't know about the fridge.  Like most things its easier to apply when warm.   It starts of like a thick sticky goo.  You apply it to both surfaces, it gets into all the cracks and crevices which means the layer lines actually help as its more surface area.  When its dry to the touch/non tacky, you press the parts together and apply pressure.  Thats where the 'impact' bit comes from I think in marketing speak. 

Once together they do not come apart.  There is no repositioning so you have to make sure its correct.  Its still flexible though when set like a thick rubber so its great for fabric.  As its quite thick its fills gaps well but its of limited use for a lot of parts as you cant slide fit a part, its best for gluing surfaces that you can bring together directly.

Its used a lot for the foam cosplay armour /weapons used in Uk/European larp which is where I came across it.  It works equally as well on pla/abs though. 

For armour use specifically you can fix fasteners like press studs, t-nuts etc by sandwiching them between 2 layers with a hole in the inner layer for the fastener.  For attaching straps directly you would normally cover an area larger than the strap, cover a 'patch' of the same material the same size and then coat both sides of the strap.  When ready to place you would press the strap in place and then press the patch over both.  That way the strap is held both sides and you have a lot more surface area holding.

Posted : 28/02/2021 11:48 am
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